March 6, 1982 — Ayn Rand dies

The first prophet of Objectivism, the author of “Atlas Shrugged” and “The Fountainhead”, and one of the greatest fantasy writers of the twentieth century, Ayn Rand was 77 years old when she died. The medical diagnosis was heart failure; on a more metaphorical, it’s pretty clear that a writer who so baldly exposed selfishness had experienced a failure to have a heart some decades earlier.

Rand was a divisive figure – she opposed the Vietnam War but condemned draft dodgers; she thought homosexuality was “disgusting” and “immoral” but still supported its decriminalisation, she believed in “free love” but was notoriously jealous and possessive of her lovers – and a staunch critic of the welfare state.

She died supported by government benefits, as she could not afford medical treatment on her own.

Monochrome photograph of a woman
By Photo portrait credited to “Talbot” (though not on original dust jacket). Published by the Bobbs-Merrill Company. – Scan via rohrbachlibrary.wordpress.com</a> (). The portrait as originally published on the dust jacket of The Fountainhead can be seen at this listing on Worthpoint., Public Domain, Link

As mentioned in:

Ayn Rand Is Dead — J Church

June 7, 1982 — Graceland is opened to the public

When Elvis died in 1977, he left most of his fortune to his daughter Lisa-Marie, who was only 9 at the time. The assets, including Graceland, were held in trust for her, with his father Vernon as the executor. Upon Vernon’s death in 1979, this responsibility passed to Priscilla Presley.

Taxes and other bills were eating into the inheritance, and in order to keep it going, Priscilla decided to convert Graceland into a tourist attraction. It rapidly became one of the most popular destinations in the United States, and the income it generated saved the Presley fortune. Graceland was listed in the National Register of Historic Places on November 7, 1991, and declared a National Historic Landmark on March 27, 2006.

Memphis TN Graceland gates snow.jpg
By Thomas R Machnitzki (thomas@machnitzki.com) – Own work, CC BY 3.0, Link

As mentioned in:

Going To Graceland — The Dead Milkmen

November 13, 1982 — The Vietnam Memorial in Washington DC is dedicated

A three-part memorial located in Washington DC, the Vietnam Veterans Memorial consists of three parts.

The largest is the Memorial Wall, on which the names of more than 50,000 men and woman who died or went missing in action are listed chronologically in order of death, from 1955 to 1975. The other two are a sculpture called The Three Soldiers and the Vietnam Women’s Memorial.

The memorial was opened in 1982, and represented an important milestone in America’s long healing process after the chaos and death of the Vietnam War. It remains a popular tourist attraction today.

Names of Vietnam Veterans.jpg
By Hu TotyaOwn work, CC BY-SA 4.0, Link

As mentioned in:

Civil War — Guns and Roses