The Black Meat

Made from the sun-dried meat of the giant aquatic Brazilian centipede, the Black Meat is a rare delicacy even among drug users.

Little is known of the giant aquatic Brazilian centipede, and indeed, conventional taxonomies do not list it. It is unclear whether it the insect inhabits freshwater or the seas, although the former is more likely.

The centipedes are harvested by Interzone Inc., and taken to Interzone in North Africa where the flesh is dried by the hot Saharan sun. It is then ground up to form a light black powder, which can be injected or snorted by the user. Its effects are largely undocumented, although one user who was using it mixed with Bug Powder described the experience as ‘a Kafka high’, in reference to his story, Metamorphosis.

Related drugs: Bug Powder, Mugwump Jism and The Drug That Does Not Exist.

Mugwump Jism

Secreted by the mysterious Mugwumps of Interzone, Mugwump Jism is a colorless liquid that produces intoxicating effects on humans.

In fact, Mugwump Jism actually comes in two finely distinguished varieties, with similar effects. Strangely, what excites the Mugwumps (who are sentient bipeds of about the same size as humans, and appear to be some form of amphibian) to produce this drug is artistic creation, especially of a literary variety.

However, they do produce it even without this inspiration, albeit at a slower rate, and it is a sad but not uncommon sight in Interzone to see a chained Mugwump surrounded by a small circle of addicts sucking upon its excretions.

Related drugs: The Black Meat, Bug Powder and The Drug That Does Not Exist.

Printimpolivre-bioxene

Printimpolivre-bioxene is both an hallucinogen and a paranoic. A reasonably well known compound to medical science (at least, in 2085), it is particularly effective against the alien Shorshian race.

It is often used as a poison. People who have been dosed with it can sometimes be detected by the sickly sweet odour it emits in their perspiration, by medical analysis of their bloodstream, and of course, because they’ve suddenly started seeing things that aren’t there and not trusting anyone.

Related drugs: Castran’s Binder, Miccrano, Modhra Coral, QuixHeal and Saarix-5.

Skullbustium

A drug whose very name suggests that it is not for the casual user, Skullbustium is the single most popular legal hallucinogen in America, likely because of its strength and appeal to machismo.

A very potent drug, Skullbustium appears to combine the effects of a large dose of LSD with those of amyl nitrate. As such, great care should be exercised in taking the drug, but of course, rarely is.

Related drugs: Skullbustium, Triptine, Truth and Consequences and Yaginol.

Somnambutol

Technically, that should be SomnambutolTM, which is how it inevitably appears when mentioned – even when a character says it name in dialogue (I always wondered if they actually said the TM’s or not – Mr Chaykin, if you’re reading, please let us know :)).

A recreational barbituate and hallucinogen, SomnambutolTM, is sold in pill form by the Plex, and is soluble in most common drinks. It does not seem to have much of a taste when in drinks, so it’s presumably a popular date-rape drug in the Chicago of the 2030’s.

It is also available in a more concentrated aerosolised form, in which it is commonly used by law enforcement and private security agencies for crowd control, since it knocks people out for about an hour, and does so quickly and mostly harmlessly – although use does seem to lead to slight hangover-like symptoms afterwards.

Related drugs: Mañanacillan.

Space

Space is a drug that replicates the experience of super-modernity. Which is to say, it creates the feeling of being endlessly between places in space, always between moments in time. It is a hallucination of the emotions one feels while trapped in an airport lounge waiting for a terrifyingly overdue flight, only with less interesting decor.

Why anyone finds this attractive is beyond me, but you know kids these days…

Related Drugs: Jumpstart, Mechanics and Tripwire 7.0.

Triptine

Triptine is a basic legal hallucinogen with no particular distinguishing qualities.

Its name seems deliberately intended to evoke associations with LSD and other ‘trip’ drugs, but what little evidence exists suggests that it is weaker and tamer than these.

Related drugs: Skullbustium, Truth and Consequences and Yaginol.

Tripwire 7.0

A simulation of the hallucingenic experience designed for intelligent household appliances, Tripwire 7.0 is the latest in a series of such cyberdrugs.

Its popularity among sentient machines is vast, because the experience of being a household appliance, sessile constantly and unable to interact unless the humans around you decide to talk to – i.e. demand something of – you, is a spectactularly dull one.

It’s hard to blame the machines, really.

Related Drugs: Jumpstart, Mechanics and Space.

Truth or Consequences

Truth or Consequences, as the name suggests, has effects similar to the party game of the same name, with one key diffference: you can’t quit. A colourless liquid not very different from water to touch, it is often used to provoke responses that are more honest than the respondent would like.

The drug suppresses inhibitions, leading those who have taken it to speak their minds with great vehemence. As such, it is a common prank for the drug to be unknowingly administered to priests, politicians, cops and other self-appointed moral authorities. It is equally common for such pranks to end in gunfire.

Related drugs: Skullbustium, Triptine and Yaginol.

X-Drugs

X-Drugs are like a stronger form of LSD. So strong, in fact, that they grant the user a certain amount of superpowers – including telekinesis, teleportation, intangebility, reversal of personal gravity and super-speed – while they last. A standard dose lasts a short time – an hour or so – and reportedly, the experience is quite a rush. Despite the name, there is in fact only one X-Drug, although it is often tailored to the DNA of the user for maximum effectiveness.

The principle by which X-Drugs operate is based on an unusual interpretation of certain aspects of quantum physics, notably Heisenberg’s Uncertainty Principle. They allow the user to make the apparent manipulation of reality by consciousness under LSD to be an actual manipulation, albeit of a strongly limited nature.

X-Drugs were created by an unamed former faculty member at UC Berkeley, and later improved by both the Scary Clowns and their enemies, the Troop.

No, actually, all of the above is a lie: there are no X-Drugs: they are fictional even in the context of the fiction in which they appear, and their effects were simulated by the Scary Clowns for their own purposes.

Yaginol

An hallucinogen whose name suggests a connection with the Yagé plant, Yaginol is one the most popular recreational drugs of the over-populated dystopia that is Stand on Zanzibar.

Although legal to sell and use, interested parties should be aware that it is known to cuase birth defects – which is one of the more subtle ways in which the government attempts to combat over-population.

Related drugs: Skullbustium, Triptine and Truth and Consequences.